Skip Navigation

Course 708 - OSHA Recordkeeping Basics

1    2    3    4    5    6    7    Course Homepage     Final Exam      Contact Instructor     Website Homepage
Safety guides and audits to make your job as a safety professional easier

Maintaining Forms

form
Click to Enlarge. View instructions at OSHA's Forms Overview page.

In this module, we'll begin discussing the requirements for use of the various OSHA recordkeeping and reporting forms in Paragraphs (14) through (24).

Forms/Required Forms

Use OSHA 300, 300-A, and OSHA Form 301 or equivalent forms, for recordable injuries and illnesses.

  • The OSHA 300 form is the Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
  • the OSHA 300-A is the Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses
  • OSHA Form 301 or equivalent is the Worker's and Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Disease

Keep the OSHA Form 301: Even if you are exempt from recordkeeping, you must have at each establishment a copy of OSHA Form 301 or equivalent for each occupational injury or illness that may result in a compensable claim.

You must enter information about your business at the top of the OSHA 300 Log, enter a one or two line description for each recordable injury or illness, and summarize this information on the OSHA 300-A at the end of the year.

You must complete an OSHA Form 301, or equivalent form, for each recordable injury or illness entered on the OSHA 300 Log.

Record within 7 days: You must enter each recordable injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log and OSHA Form 301 or equivalent within 7 calendar days of receiving information that a recordable injury or illness has occurred: for example, if a new case is discovered.

Equivalent forms: An equivalent form is one that has the same information, is as readable and understandable, and is completed using the same instructions as the OSHA form it replaces. Many employers use an insurance form instead of the OSHA Form 301 or supplement an insurance form by adding any additional information required by OSHA.

Computer forms: Use a computer to keep your records if it can produce equivalent forms when needed.

Employee Privacy

If you have a "privacy concern case," do not enter the employee's name on the OSHA 300 Log. Instead, enter "privacy case" in the space normally used for the employee's name. This will protect the privacy of the injured or ill employee when another employee, a former employee, or an authorized employee representative has access to the OSHA 300 Log.

You must keep a separate, confidential list of the case numbers and employee names for your privacy concern cases so you can update the cases and provide the information to the government if asked to do so.

The following is a complete list of injuries or illnesses that are considered privacy concern cases:

  • An injury or illness to an intimate body part or the reproductive system;
  • An injury or illness resulting from a sexual assault;
  • Mental illnesses;
  • HIV infection, hepatitis, or tuberculosis;
  • Needlestick injuries and cuts from sharp objects contaminated with another person's blood or other potentially infectious material; and
  • Other illnesses, if the employee voluntarily requests that his or her name not be entered on the log.

Use discretion in privacy cases. If you reasonably believe that information describing the privacy concern case may be personally identifiable even though the employee's name is omitted, use discretion in describing the injury or illness on both the OSHA 300 and OSHA 301 Forms. Enter enough information to identify the cause of the incident and the general severity of the injury or illness, but you do not need to include details of an intimate or private nature. For example:

  • describe a sexual assault case as an "injury from assault"
  • an injury to a reproductive organ could be described as "lower abdominal injury"

Disclosing personal identification. If you voluntarily disclose the forms to persons other than government representatives, employees, former employees, or authorized representatives, you must remove or hide the employees' names and other personally identifying information except for in the following cases:

  • To an auditor or consultant hired by the employer to evaluate the safety and health program
  • To the extent necessary for processing a claim for workers' compensation or other insurance benefits, or
  • To a public health authority or law enforcement agency for uses and disclosures for which consent, an authorization, or opportunity to agree or object is not required under Department of Health and Human Services Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information, 45 CFR.164.512.

Multiple Business Establishments

How Workers' Comp Works - Missouri.

Keep a separate OSHA 300 Log for each establishment that you expect to operate for 1-year or longer.

  • You may keep one OSHA 300 Log that covers all of your short-term establishments. You may also include the short-term establishment's recordable injuries and illnesses on an OSHA 300 Log that covers short-term establishments for individual company divisions or geographic regions.
  • You may keep the records for an establishment at your headquarters or other central location if:
    1. you can transmit information about the injuries and illnesses from the establishment to the central location within 7 calendar days of receiving information that a recordable injury or illness has occurred; and
    2. produce and send the records from the central location to the establishment within the time frames required by 29 CFR 1904(20) and 29 CFR 1904(22) when you are required to provide records to a government representative, employees, former employees or employee representatives.
  • You must link each employee with one of your establishments, for recordkeeping purposes. You must record the injury and illness on the OSHA 300 Log of the injured or ill employee's establishment or on an OSHA 300 Log that covers that employee's short term establishment.
  • If the injury or illness occurs at one of your establishments, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log of the establishment where the injury or illness occurred. If the employee is injured or becomes ill and is not at one of your establishments, you must record the case on the OSHA 300 Log at the establishment where the employee normally works.

Covered Employees

Covered employees include:

Picture
  1. anyone on your payroll, or
  2. if they're not on your payroll, you supervise them on a day-by-day basis.

You must record on the OSHA 300 Log the recordable injuries and illnesses of all employees on your payroll, whether they are labor, executive, hourly, salary, part-time, seasonal, or migrant workers.

You also must record the recordable injuries and illnesses that occur to employees who are not on your payroll if you supervise these employees on a day-to-day basis. If your business is organized as a sole proprietorship or partnership, the owner or partners are not considered employees for recordkeeping purposes.

Temporary help agencies: Record the injuries and illnesses to workers from temporary help agencies or employee leasing services only if you supervise these employees on a day-to-day basis.

Contractor employees: If a contractor's employee is under the day-to-day supervision of the contractor, the contractor is responsible for recording the injury or illness. If you supervise the contractor employee's work on a day-to-day basis, you must record the injury or illness.

Record the injury once: You and the temporary help service, employee leasing service, personnel supply service, or contractor should coordinate your efforts to make sure that each injury and illness is recorded only once. Either on:

  1. your OSHA 300 Log if you provide day-to-day supervision, or
  2. on the other employer's OSHA 300 Log if that company provides day-today supervision.

Annual Summary

At the end of each calendar year, you must:

  • Review the OSHA 300 Log to verify that the entries are complete and accurate. Correct any problems.
  • Use the OSHA 300A or equivalent form to create an annual summary of injuries and illnesses from the OSHA 300 Log;
  • Certify that the highest ranking manager at the location where the log is compiled has examined the OSHA 300 Log and believes, based on knowledge of the process by which the information was recorded, that it is correct and complete. If there is no management at the compiling location, any manager with jurisdiction over that location may conduct the examination of the OSHA 300 Log.
  • Post a copy of the annual summary in each establishment in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted. You must ensure that the posted annual summary is not altered, defaced or covered by other material. You must post the summary no later than February 1 of the year following the year covered by the records and keep it posted until April 30.

Check out this video!

This is a good video on how to complete an OSHA 300 Log. Although the video describes completing the form in Oregon, the information applies in every state. As usual, Oregon OSHA creates great safety information!

This video covers the steps in completing the OSHA 300A Summary. Well worth your viewing!

Instructions

Before beginning this quiz, we highly recommend you review the module material. This quiz is designed to allow you to self-check your comprehension of the module content, but only focuses on key concepts and ideas.

Read each question carefully. Select the best answer, even if more than one answer seems possible. When done, click on the "Get Quiz Answers" button. If you do not answer all the questions, you will receive an error message.

Good luck!

1. Which form is not one used to record and report injuries and illnesses?

2. Which of the forms below is the Worker's and Employer's Report of Occupational Injury or Disease?

3. Which of the following forms must you keep a copy of at each establishment even if your are exempt from recordkeeping?

4. How soon, upon of receiving information that a recordable injury or illness has occurred, must you enter each recordable injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log and OSHA Form 301 or equivalent?

5. Each of the following is considered an OSHA 300 Log privacy case, except _____.

6. When must you record the recordable injuries and illnesses that occur to employees who are not on your payroll?

7. Which of the following best defines "covered employees"?

8. The employer must certify that the highest ranking manager at the location where the OSHA 300 Log is compiled has accomplished all of the following, except _____.

9. For what period of time, during the year following covered by the records, must the OSHA 300-A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses be posted?


Have a great day!

Important! You will receive an "error" message unless all questions are answered.