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Reporting Requirements

What am I required to report?

Commitment is time and money.
OSHA reporting decision tree.

All employers under OSHA jurisdiction must report work-related fatalities, in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye to OSHA, even if they are exempt from routinely keeping OSHA records.

Employers have to report the following events to OSHA:

  1. All work-related fatalities
  2. All work-related in-patient hospitalizations of one or more employees. OSHA defines in-patient hospitalization as a formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.
  3. All work-related amputations. An amputation is the traumatic loss of a limb or other external body part. Amputations include a part, such as a limb or appendage, that has been severed, cut off, amputated (either completely or partially); fingertip amputations with or without bone loss; medical amputations resulting from irreparable damage; amputations of body parts that have since been reattached. Amputations do not include avulsions (tissue torn away from the body), enucleations (removal of the eyeball), deglovings (skin torn away from the underlying tissue), scalpings (removal of the scalp), severed ears, or broken or chipped teeth.
  4. All work-related losses of an eye

When do I have to report work-related fatalities, injuries, and illnesses?

Employers must report work-related fatalities within 8 hours of finding out about it.

For any in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or eye loss, employers must report the incident within 24 hours of learning about it.

Only fatalities occurring within 30 days of the work-related incident must be reported to OSHA. For an inpatient hospitalization, amputation or loss of an eye, the incident must be reported to OSHA only if they occur within 24 hours of the work-related incident.

1. After you learn about an in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or eye loss, you must report the incident _____.

a. no later than 8 hours
b. within 24 hours
c. within 30 days
d. as soon as possible

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What information do I need to give to OSHA?

Commitment is time and money.
Notify OSHA as required.

You must give OSHA the following information for each fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye:

  1. The establishment name;
  2. The location of the work-related incident;
  3. The time of the work-related incident;
  4. The type of reportable event (i.e., fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye);
  5. The number of employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;
  6. The names of the employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;
  7. Your contact person and his or her phone number; and
  8. A brief description of the work-related incident.

How do I report work-related incidents to OSHA?

You can use one of the following methods to report to OSHA:

  1. By telephone to the nearest OSHA Area Office during normal business hours. You may not report using an answering machine, faxing, or sending an email.
  2. By telephone to the 24-hour OSHA hotline (1-800-321-OSHA or 1-800-321-6742).
  3. You can report events electronically on OSHA's Electronic Submission website.

2. You may report workplace fatalities, in-patient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye to OSHA using each of the following methods EXCEPT _____.

a. calling the nearest OSHA office
b. reporting on OSHA's website
c. calling the OSHA 24-hour hotline
d. faxing or emailing

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Commitment is time and money.
Notify OSHA as required.

Must I report a recordable incident that resulted from a motor vehicle accident on a public street or highway?

  • Yes. If the accident occurred in a construction work zone.
  • No. If the accident occurred on a public street or highway, but not in a construction work zone. However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep them.

Do I have to report to OSHA if the incident occurred on a commercial or public transportation system?

  • No, you do not have to report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA if it occurred on a commercial or public transportation system (e.g., airplane, train, subway, or bus). However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep them.

Do I have to report a work-related fatality or in-patient hospitalization caused by a heart attack?

  • Yes, your local OSHA Area Office director will decide whether to investigate the event, depending on the circumstances of the heart attack.

3. What must the employer do if an employee has a recordable motor vehicle accident on a construction site?

a. Report it and record it
b. Record it, but don't report it
c. Report it, but don't record it
d. Neither record it nor report it

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What if the reportable fatality, injury, or illness does not occur during or right after the work-related incident?

Commitment is time and money.
Report if a hospitalization occurs within 24 hours after the incident.

You must only report a fatality to OSHA if the fatality occurs within 30 days of the work-related incident.

For an in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye, you must only report the event to OSHA if it occurs within 24 hours of the work-related incident.

However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.

What if I don't learn about a reportable or work-related incident right away?

If you do not learn about a reportable incident at the time it takes place or a work-related incident right away, you must make a report to OSHA within the following time period after the incident is reported to you or to any of your agent(s):

  • 8 hours for a fatality, and
  • 24 hours for an in-patient hospitalization, an amputation, or a loss of an eye.

4. According to OSHA, you must only report a fatality to OSHA if it occurred _____.

a. the same day
b. within 8 hours of being notified
c. within 30 days of the work-related incident
d. within 24 hours

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How does OSHA define "in-patient hospitalization"?

Commitment is time and money.
No need to report hospitalization for observation or diagnostic testing only.

OSHA defines in-patient hospitalization as a formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.

Do I have to report an in-patient hospitalization that involves only observation or diagnostic testing?

  • No, you do not have to report an in-patient hospitalization that involves only observation or diagnostic testing. You must only report to OSHA each inpatient hospitalization that involves care or treatment.

How does OSHA define "amputation"?

An amputation is the traumatic loss of a limb or other external body part. Amputations include a part, such as a limb or appendage, that has been severed, cut off, amputated (either completely or partially); fingertip amputations with or without bone loss; medical amputations resulting from irreparable damage; amputations of body parts that have since been reattached. Amputations do not include avulsions, enucleations, deglovings, scalpings, severed ears, or broken or chipped teeth.

5. Which of the following in-patient services would NOT require reporting to OSHA?

a. Observation and diagnostic testing
b. In-patient care and treatment
c. Minor in-patient treatment of illnesses
d. In-patient stays of 24 hours or less

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Electronic Submission of Records to OSHA

Electronic Reporting - Wade Associates.

There are two categories of employers who must routinely submit information from their injury and illness records to OSHA:

  1. If your establishment had 250 or more employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and the standard requires your establishment to keep records, then you must electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses to OSHA or OSHA's designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form (for example, submit the 2020 300A by March 2, 2021).
  2. If your establishment had 20 or more employees but fewer than 250 employees at any time during the previous calendar year, and your establishment is classified in an industry listed in appendix A to subpart E of the standard, then you must electronically submit information from OSHA Form 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses to OSHA or OSHA's designee. You must submit the information once a year, no later than March 2 of the year after the calendar year covered by the form.

Upon notification, you must electronically submit the requested information from your part 1904 records to OSHA. For each establishment that is subject to these reporting requirements, you must provide the employer identification number (EIN) used by the establishment.

For more information on electronically submitting records to OSHA be sure to 29 CFR 1904.41, Electronic submission of injury and illness records to OSHA.

6. If your company has more than 250 employees, when must the 2020 300A Summary Form information be electronically submitted to OSHA?

a. By December 15, 2020
b. By April 15, 2022
c. By January 30, 2021
d. By March 2, 2021

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