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Course 803 - Scaffold Safety Program Management

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Scaffold Training Requirements

training

Introduction

Each employee who performs work while on a scaffold should be trained by a person qualified in the subject matter to recognize the hazards associated with the type of scaffold being used and to understand the procedures to control or minimize those hazards. The training should include the following areas, as applicable:

  • General overview of scaffolding
    • regulations and standards
    • erection/dismantling
    • PPE and proper procedures
    • fall hazards and protective strategies
    • electrical hazards
    • materials handling
    • access and use of walkways and platform components
    • working platform load capacities
    • foundations
    • guys, ties and braces
  • Learn the nature of any electrical hazards, fall hazards and falling object hazards in the work area.
  • Know the correct procedures for dealing with electrical hazards and for erecting, maintaining, and disassembling the fall protection systems and falling object protection systems being used.
  • Determine the proper use of the scaffold and the proper handling of materials on the scaffold.
  • Know the maximum intended load and the load-carrying capacities of the scaffolds used.

Competent Person

Each employee who is involved in erecting, disassembling, moving, operating, repairing, maintaining, or inspecting a scaffold should be trained by a competent person to recognize any hazards associated with the work in question. The training should include the following topics, as applicable:

  • the nature of scaffold hazards
  • the correct procedures for erecting, disassembling, moving, operating, repairing, inspecting, and maintaining the type of scaffold in question
  • the design criteria, maximum intended load-carrying capacity and intended use of the scaffold
  • any other pertinent requirements of the employer’s program

The competent person(s) should receive additional training regarding the selection of scaffolds, recognition of site conditions, scaffold hazard recognition, protection of exposed personnel and the public, repair and replacement options, and requirements of standards.

Retraining

Site management personnel should also be familiar with correct scaffolding procedures so they can better determine needs and identify deficiencies.

If the employer has reason to believe an employee lacks the skill or understanding needed for safe work involving the erection, use or dismantling of scaffolds, the employer should retrain each the employee so that the required proficiency is regained.

Retraining is required in at least the following situations:

  • changes at the worksite present a hazard about which an employee has not been previously trained
  • changes in the types of scaffolds, fall protection, falling object protection, or other equipment present a hazard about which an employee has not been previously trained
  • inadequacies in an affected employee's work involving scaffolds indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite proficiency

Training Requirements

Summary of Training Requirements for Scaffold Users
Those who work from scaffolds Those who erect and dismantle scaffolds
Critical Scaffold Issues
  • falling objects
  • fall protection
  • material handling on scaffolds
  • scaffold load capacities
  • scaffold design criteria
  • scaffold erecting, disassembling, moving, and maintenance procedures
  • scaffold erecting, disassembling, and moving hazards
  • scaffold load capacities
What They Need to Know
  • how to use appropriate fall-protection systems
  • how to control scaffold hazards
  • how to use scaffold walkways, platform components, and access areas
  • maximum-intended and load-carrying capacities of scaffolds
  • subdivision 3/L requirements
  • hazards involved in erecting/ dismantling
  • erection/ dismantling planning procedures
  • how to deal with electrical hazards
  • how to inspect components
  • appropriate design criteria
  • maximum-intended and load-carrying capacities of scaffolds
  • subdivision 3/L requirements
Who Can Train Them
  • any person who has training and experience in the critical scaffold issues (above) and who can teach the issues to scaffold users
  • subdivision 3/L refers to a person with these skills as a qualified person
  • any person who has training and experience in the critical scaffold issues (above), who can teach the issues to erectors/dismantlers, and who has authority to control scaffold hazards
  • subdivision 3/L refers to a person with these skills as a competent person
How Often to Train Them
  • before they begin a new job
  • whenever changes at the worksite present new hazards
  • whenever they fail to demonstrate skills related to any of the critical scaffold issues
  • before they begin a new job
  • whenever changes at the worksite present new hazards
  • whenever they fail to demonstrate skills related to any of the critical scaffold issues

Develop a Scaffold Training Plan

Effective training programs don’t just happen. They require careful planning, explicit goals and objectives, dedicated instructors, and motivated students. It doesn’t matter whether the activity is athletics, academics, or occupational safety and health. The underlying training concepts are similar:

  1. design a training program
  2. conduct training
  3. evaluate training effectiveness
  4. improve training through feedback

In the next several tabs, we'll take a closer look at these training concepts.

Develop a Scaffold Training Plan (Continued)

1. Design a Training Program

Determine if training is needed. Determine whether a worksite problem can be solved by training. Will training solve the problem or are hazards or engineering problems causing injuries?

Training is most effective when it focuses on what workers need to know to do their jobs safely. Training is especially helpful for inexperienced workers, new workers, and workers unfamiliar with special processes and equipment.

Identify training needs. Establish what the worker is expected to do and identify hazardous tasks. Analyze each task to determine what the worker should learn to do a job safely.

Design learning activities. Learning activities enable workers to demonstrate acquired desired skills and knowledge. The activities should simulate actual job tasks as closely as possible. Learning activities can be group-oriented, with lectures, role playing, and demonstrations. They can also be designed as self-paced activities for individual workers.

Develop a Scaffold Training Plan (Continued)

2. Conduct the Training

Plan the training structure and format. Consider the number, frequency, and length of sessions. Determine instructional techniques and who will do the training.

Make sure the training is well-organized and has clearly defined objectives. Give workers an overview of what they’ll learn. Relate training materials to tasks and jobs.

Include hands-on experience and role-playing activities, if possible. Reinforce learning by summarizing objectives and key concepts. Be sure to let workers participate in discussions and ask questions.

Click here to download a scaffold safety sample lesson plan.

Develop a Scaffold Training Plan (Continued)

3. Evaluate Training Effectiveness

How do you know training is accomplishing your objectives? Develop a plan to objectively evaluate training effectiveness. Ask workers what they’ve learned through training. Ask supervisors if workers are accomplishing training goals. Examine trends in your injury or illness statistics for changes that training may have influenced.

4. Improve Training through Feedback

Collect and evaluate feedback from workers, supervisors, and others affected by the training. When you’re sifting through what people had to say about the training, consider these questions:

  • Did the training focus on critical elements of the job?
  • Were major gaps in workers’ knowledge or skills covered?
  • Were the training objectives presented clearly?
  • Did the objectives state the performance levels expected of workers?
  • Did learning activities simulate actual work tasks?
  • Were learning activities appropriate for the knowledge and skills the jobs required?
  • Were training materials organized and presented clearly?
  • Were workers motivated to learn?
  • Were workers encouraged to participate and to ask questions? Adjust the training program if the feedback warrants a change.

Instructions

Before beginning this quiz, we highly recommend you review the module material. This quiz is designed to allow you to self-check your comprehension of the module content, but only focuses on key concepts and ideas.

Read each question carefully. Select the best answer, even if more than one answer seems possible. When done, click on the "Get Quiz Answers" button. If you do not answer all the questions, you will receive an error message.

Good luck!

1. Which of the following topics should be included in scaffold safety training?

2. The competent person(s) should receive additional training regarding which of the following topics?

3. The first step in designing a scaffold safety training program is to _____.

4. Once you have determine that training is needed, the next step in designing the training program is to _____.

5. Make sure the scaffold training you design includes _____.


Have a great day!

Important! You will receive an "error" message unless all questions are answered.