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Course 904 - Oil and Gas Well Inspection

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Safety guides and audits to make your job as a safety professional easier
drilling line

Lines and Slings

Auxiliary Hoisting Lines

The purpose of this inspection is to ensure that hoisting lines are operating properly.

Location/Type

Note the location and type of each auxiliary hoisting line found on the rig.

Cable Condition

Check the condition of each wire rope.

  • Look for kinks or cuts in the line from being pinched or impacted.
  • hoisting lines
  • Look for crushing of the cable on the drum or anywhere along the line where the internal core may have failed.
  • Look for broken wires along the length of the line and replace as per company guidelines.
  • Look for worn areas along the line. Cables that have rust down inside the strands should be replaced.
  • Note specific problems in comment section.

Auxiliary Hoisting Lines (Continued)

rope failure

Sheaves

Check structural members used to support sheave installations for cracks, deformities, and wear. The sheave should hang freely and be able to turn as needed when under load. Inspect the spindle or mandrel in the swivel assembly for wear. Shackles used to hang the sheave must be of the 4-part type with bolt and locking pin. Screw pin type shackles should not be used in overhead applications. Check that safety cables are installed where they do not interfere with the normal operation of the sheave.

Routing

Check that the routing of the hoist cable runs freely without excessive contact with structural components of the mast. Pay particular attention to areas around the racking board and fingers where the cable can become trapped and cause excessive wear to the fingers and cable. Check equipment to see if hoist lines have been in contact with them. Top drive drilling units, rotary hose and service loop clamps, and stabbing boards can all be damaged by, or cause damage to, hoisting lines.

Auxiliary Hoisting Lines (Continued)

cable clips

Line Guides

If used, check to ensure they are not causing undue wear on the cable and that they are performing properly. Screw pin shackles should not be used for line guides on active hoist lines. The pins may be unscrewed by the movement of the cable and result in a dropped object.

End Connections

Check that thimbles and mechanical sleeve fittings are not deformed or bent. Check for broken wires in and around factory installed mechanical sleeve fittings.

Active hoist lines should always have factory installed fittings. If wire rope clips are used on hoist lines, the load rating of the cable should be reduced by 20 percent. Poured socket fittings done with Thermoset resin should be checked for cracks and broken resin in the fitting. Inspect the winch socket to ensure the anchor point is secure and the cable will not come off the drum.

Static Hanging Lines

Conduct this inspection to ensure that static hanging lines are in good condition.

Location

Identify the static lines located on the rig and list them for inspection.

Type

Indicate the type of line including size and manufacturer identification number.

Cable Condition

Look for kinks that may have occurred during rig up, cuts in the line can result from impact by pipe or iron, and crushing of the cable or flat spots along the line where the internal core may have failed. Identify broken wires along the length of the line and replace as per company guidelines.

Look for areas along the line where it may have rubbed against itself or the structure. Cables that have rust down inside the strands should be replaced.

Static Hanging Lines (Continued)

cableclamp

Wire Rope or Cable Clips

Ensure that the size and number are correct for the size of line being used as per manufacturer recommendations. Check the installation if the cable clamps are correct and in compliance with good rigging practices. Make sure that any cable tail will not present a snag hazard or get fouled with other lines or traveling equipment.

Installation

Inspect for cracks, deformities, and wear. Shackles used to hang static lines over work areas should be the 4-part type with bolt and locking pin. Screw pin shackles should not be used to hang static lines overhead.

Static Hanging Lines (Continued)

Routing

Check the routing of the static cable to ensure that it hangs freely without excessive contact with structural components of the mast. Pay particular attention to areas around the girts and racking board where the cable can become trapped.

Check the length of the cable to ensure it has not been smashed by pipe or traveling equipment. Block hanging lines should be tied back out of the way and if the shackle is left attached it should be properly secured to prevent dropped objects.

Temporary installations of top drive drilling units may exceed the load rating on the block hanging line and/or the hanger on top of the traveling block.

Top drive drilling units, rotary hose and service loop clamps, and stabbing boards, can all be damaged by, or cause damage to, static hanging lines.

End Connections

Inspect thimbles and mechanical sleeve fittings for bending or deformities. Check for broken wires in and around factory installed mechanical sleeve fittings. When wire rope clips are used on static lines, the load rating of the cable may need to be reduced. Poured socket fittings done with Thermoset resin should be checked for cracks and broken resin in the fitting.

Synthetic Web Slings

weblines

Because cranes, derricks, and hoists rely upon slings to hold their suspended loads, slings are the most commonly used piece of materials-handling apparatus.

The reason we conduct this inspection is to ensure that synthetic web slings are safe for use.

More information on the guidance of safe sling

Location and Type

Maintain a log of all lifting slings on the rig. Inspections prior to use and each year are required by federal regulation and are part of good safety practice. Slings should be marked by the manufacturer with the safe working load and the date of manufacture.

These tags should not be taken off the sling or otherwise destroyed. If tags are missing, the sling should be removed from service and destroyed.

Slings should be stored in a clean, dry place where they are out of direct sunlight and protected from the weather. In addition, slings should be stored away from heat and chemicals that may harden or damage the fibers. Slings should be hung up and not left on the floor or deck.

Synthetic Web Slings (Continued)

weblines

Inspection

Check each sling individually for the following conditions: wear, broken stitches, heat damage, chemical damage, holes or tears, cuts or snags, or damage to the end fitting.

  • Mark any damage on the inspection form.
  • Mark the damaged sling and remove it from use.
  • Start with the end eye or fitting.
  • Inspect the chaff guard inside the eye if the sling has one.
  • Look the eye over carefully to determine if it has been stretched or pulled over a large object.
  • See if there is any evidence of knotting or twisting of the eye.
  • Move to the body of the sling looking for signs of snagging, broken threads, tears, or cuts.
  • Make sure the sling has not been tightened around a sharp corner that would cut the fabric.
  • Synthetic web slings are manufactured with a red “tattle tale” yarn woven inside the strap itself. If you can see this red string, it means that the sling has been stretched or otherwise damaged and it should be taken out of service and destroyed.
  • Check for burn marks or melting that may have occurred around welding activities. Slings that are used around welding should be protected from the heat and the sparks and should never be installed on hot iron. Chemical exposure can also burn or harden synthetic slings.

Some companies use a color code system to identify what year a sling was inspected. Some larger slings may last for many years and would need to be inspected, recorded, and color coded for the current year. Use only marking paint recommended by the sling manufacturer to color code slings. Other paints may damage the sling and render it useless.

Video

Instructions

Before beginning this quiz, we highly recommend you review the module material. This quiz is designed to allow you to self-check your comprehension of the module content, but only focuses on key concepts and ideas.

Read each question carefully. Select the best answer, even if more than one answer seems possible. When done, click on the "Get Quiz Answers" button. If you do not answer all the questions, you will receive an error message.

Good luck!

1. When inspecting cables on the rig, check for all of the following, except _____.

2. In your inspection of shackles used on a rig, make sure _____ shackles are not used in overhead applications.

3. Inspection of lifting slings _____ are required by federal regulation and are part of good safety practice.

4. During your inspection of slings on the rig, check for each of the following evidence of damage, except _____.

5. When inspecting wire rope or cable slings, make sure the sling has not _____.


Have a great day!

Important! You will receive an "error" message unless all questions are answered.