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Course 904 - Oil and Gas Well Inspection

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wire rope

Lines and Slings (Continued)

Wire Rope or Cable Slings

It’s important to do this inspection to ensure that wire ropes are safe for use. For more information see: 29CFR1910.184 (f) and manufacturer information.

Location and Type

Maintain a log of all lifting slings on the rig. Inspections prior to use and each year are required by law. Good practice instruct that slings should be marked by the manufacturer with the safe working load and the date of manufacture.

Tables of working load by size and type of wire rope should be available in case tags are damaged.

Slings should be stored in a clean, dry place where they are protected from the weather. In addition, slings should be stored away from heat and chemicals that may remove the lubricants from the cable.

Slings should be hung up and should not be hung off the floor or deck.

Wire Rope or Cable Sling (Continued)

rope failure

Inspection

Check each sling individually for the following conditions: wear, broken wires, heat damage, corrosion, kinks or doglegs, eye deformation, or damage to the end fitting.

Mark any damage on the inspection form, mark the sling, and remove it from use.

Start with the end eye or fitting. Inspect the inside of the eye for wear or broken wires. Look the eye over carefully to determine if it has been stretched or pulled over a large object. See if there is any evidence of knotting or twisting of the eye.

Inspect the swaged fittings for cracks or bending, paying close attention to where the wires enter the fitting.

Move to the body of the sling. Does it show any deformation, such as kinking, knots, or crushing? Make sure the sling has not been tightened around a sharp corner that would cut or break the cable.

Ensure that there are not more than five randomly distributed broken wires in one strand in one lay length of rope. If more than 10 broken wires are found in one rope lay or the sling exhibits other damage, it should be taken out of service and destroyed.

Inspection (Continued)

slingformula
Click to Enlarge

Check for burn marks or melting that may have occurred around welding activities. Slings that are used around welding should be protected from the heat and the sparks and should never be installed on hot iron.

Check for corrosion from chemicals or exposure to water.

Look for flattening or crushing of the cable that would indicate damage to the internal wire rope core. Any damage to the internal core would be cause to take the sling out of service.

Some companies use a color code system to identify what year a sling was inspected. Some larger slings may last for many years and would need to be inspected, recorded, and color coded for the current year.

Chain Slings

wire rope

Conduct this inspection to ensure that chains are in good condition and ready for use. For more information see: 29CFR1910.184 and manufacturer documentation.

Location and Type

Maintain a log of all chain slings on the rig. Inspections prior to use and each year are required by law. Good practice instructs that slings should be marked by the manufacturer with the safe working load and the date of manufacture. These tags should not be taken off the sling or otherwise destroyed.

Chain slings should be stored in a clean, dry place where they are protected from the weather and are away from moving equipment. Chains should be hung up and off left on the floor or deck.

Chain Slings (Continued)

cable sling

Inspection

Individually check each sling for the following conditions: inner link wear, bent link, stretched chain, gouges, heat damage, cuts or nicks, or damage to the end fitting. Mark any damage on the inspection form, mark the sling, and remove it from use.

Start with the end eye or fitting. Inspect the lift ring if the sling has one. Make sure that the lift eye is not distorted or pulled out of shape.

Look the eye over carefully to determine if it has been stretched or pulled over a large object. See if there is any evidence of welding or cutting of the eye.

Move to the body of the sling for signs of nicks or bent links. Examine links for evidence of over pulling. Look for melting that may have occurred around welding activities.

cable sling

Chain slings that are used around welding should be protected from the heat and sparks and should never be arced or burned.

Look for wear or damage to end links used to attach the chain to the end fittings. Verify that the keeper pins are in place and that the link swivels and moves freely. Chain slings should not be welded by the link to equipment. A chain sling can be pulled tight down on a load resulting in very dangerous sling angles.

Chain slings should have no more of a sling angle than cable slings used for the same purpose.

Examine end hooks for bending and misalignment. Chain hooks should fit snugly between the links and be sized properly for the chain.

Shackles

shackle

You need to do this inspection to ensure that shackles are in good condition and ready for use. For more information see: manufacturer documentation.

Location and Type

List all shackles with manufacturer and load rating. If a color code system is being used for lifting equipment, it should be applied to the shackles also.

Pins

Inspect the pin closely to ensure that the threads and shoulder are in good condition. Threads should not be damaged and components should screw together smoothly by hand pressure only.

If tools are required to force the pin or bolt into the bow of the shackle, then one or more of the components has been damaged and should be taken out of service.

Screw pins should “shoulder up” against the outside face of the shackle ear. Bending along the length of the pin may indicate that the shackle has been over loaded and it should be taken out of service and destroyed.

Shackles (Continued)

Four-Part Shackles

These are shackles that include a safety keeper or cotter key that prevents the nut from backing off the pin. The safety keeper or cotter pin should be the proper length and diameter to fit snuggly in the hole through the pin.

At no time should the shackle be assembled for use with just the safety pin installed; the nut must be in place and snug with the safety pin installed prior to loading the shackle.

Four-part shackles should be used in permanent or semi–permanent overhead installations and should be inspected weekly to ensure the safety pin and nut are secure and that the shackle has not been damaged by traveling equipment or other contact.

Video

Instructions

Before beginning this quiz, we highly recommend you review the module material. This quiz is designed to allow you to self-check your comprehension of the module content, but only focuses on key concepts and ideas.

Read each question carefully. Select the best answer, even if more than one answer seems possible. When done, click on the "Get Quiz Answers" button. If you do not answer all the questions, you will receive an error message.

Good luck!

1. When inspecting chain slings, look for all of the following indications of physical damage, except _____.

2. When inspecting chain slings, ensure chain slings have no more of a sling angle when lifting than _____ used for the same purpose.

3. When inspecting 4-part shackles, ensure that at no time the shackle is being assembled for use with just the _____ installed.

4. What does it mean if tools are required to force the pin or bolt into the bow of the shackle?

5. _____ should be used in permanent or semi–permanent overhead installations.


Have a great day!

Important! You will receive an "error" message unless all questions are answered.