Course 703 - Introduction to OSH Training

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Classroom Safety Training Model

Preparation

Choose a good location to train. Orientation can be held in a classroom, but specific safety training needs to occur where the work will be done.

Talk about what is going to be taught. Make sure you also set aside enough time to get all the training accomplished.

Tell the worker why training is important. Again, this is the essence of education. If the worker knows why the training is important, they will be pay attention.

Ask the worker what he or she already knows. You may be surprised at the depth or lack of knowledge. Be flexible so you can adapt to the worker's level of knowledge and ability.

Presentation

Describe safety procedures; general to specific, simple to complex, known to unknown.

Demonstrate safety procedures; one step at a time. This is critical. The worker must see it done properly. If the supervisor is not fully qualified, get another person. However, the supervisor should always be involved.

Repeat each step if necessary; be patient. At regular intervals, ask the worker if he or she understands the process or procedure.

Involvement

Ask the worker to perform safe procedures. Demonstration is at the very heart of the training. Never trivialize it.

Correct any errors immediately; address performance, not the person. Your approach should reflect concern for their success. Their success is your success. Be patient.

Practice until you and workers are confident. Let them try a number of times until they (and you) are confident of their ability.

Follow-up

Observe worker performing safety procedures on the job. At first, you may need to pay close attention to the new worker.

Ask for feedback; encourage questions. Make sure the worker is comfortable communicating any problems or concerns.

Give feedback on performance. Recognize performance that meets or exceeds your expectations. Identify weaknesses.

Decrease observations over time as appropriate.

Periodically monitor performance.