Management and Leadership

Resources - Management Systems and Leadership

More Elements of Effective Safety Management Systems

Education and Training

For an effective safety and health program, it is crucial that everyone at the workplace understand his/her role in the program, actively work to prevent and/or control hazards and potential hazards at the worksite, and the ways they should protect themselves should a hazard occur. A good safety and health program is achievable if the following understand their roles and responsibilities within their group:

  • Employees are trained to understand the hazards of their jobs and how to protect themselves.
  • Supervisors understand their safety responsibilities; understand how to reinforce and enforce employee training.
  • Managers understand their own responsibilities regarding training.

Safety and Health Training

For an effective safety and health program, it is crucial that everyone at the workplace understand his/her role in the program, actively work to prevent and/or control hazards and potential hazards at the worksite, and the ways they should protect themselves should a hazard occur. A good safety and health program is achievable if everyone understands their roles and responsibilities within their group.

Employees. Each employee should understand how important they are to the overall picture of safety and health, not only for their well-being, but for every worker involved. Training is especially important for new employees. However, periodic retraining of all employees is also essential. The employees need to know the general safety and health rules, specific site hazards and the safe work practices that are used to control exposure, and the role they are to play in an emergency situation.

Supervisors. Supervisors should be given training both in the safety and health area and in the leadership area. The supervisor needs to be tuned in to the worksite and the potentials for hazards occurring in their areas. Supervisors need special training in the maintenance of their areas, as well as how to get their employees involved in hazards control.

Managers. It is necessary for the manager to have a good system of communication to the workers who are in his or her department. The manager must also understand what his or her role in the safety and health program is, and set the leadership example for others to follow. The employer should do whatever it takes to help raise the level of awareness of the managers at the worksite and other locations.

  • Identify training needs and objectives specific to your company.
  • Involve employees in identifying training needs and when possible use them as trainers.
  • Create a safety bulletin board as an aid in training and charge an employee with responsibility for its maintenance.
  • Establish a training budget.
  • Provide training for supervisory and managerial personnel (i.e. leadership, hazard identification, accident investigation, training methods).
  • Establish an orientation program for new hires. At a minimum, employees must know the general safety and health rules, specific site hazards and the safe work practices needed to help control exposure, and the individual's role in all types of emergency situations.
  • Evaluate training on a regular basis.
  • Establish and maintain training records.

Source: Onsite Safety & Health Consultation Program, Industrial Services Division, Illinois Department of Commerce & Community Affairs

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